Baking with Whey

About eight months ago, I decided I wanted to fund a kickstarter project. I knew I wanted to fund something to do with either tech or baking to get in on the ground floor of an exciting project. I decided on helping to fund Make Cheese Inc. I chose the mascarpone kit thinking, “I’d love to make cannolis for the holidays!”

It didn’t quite work out like I planned. The kits were delayed repeatedly due to the high volume and then to being held by Canadian customs. I didn’t receive the mascarpone kit until last Friday.

I was so giddy, I could hardly contain myself. What’s a girl to do on a Friday night but make her own cheese, right? That’s totally normal, right?

The mascarpone itself was a fun process, but it didn’t come out the way I expected. I know it won’t work for cannolis, but hopefully I can bake it into a tart of sorts.

What I didn’t put much thought into before hand was that I would be left with about three cups of whey. I did a bit of research and learned that it’s very easy for the human body to digest, packed with protein. I knew I had to find a way to use it. I decided to go on a whey baking adventure.

Day One: Banana Chocolate Chip Pancakes

I bought a banana muffin mix, fully intending to make muffins later in the week. When I got home from the grocery store, I realized, “Oh hey. You have whey to use.” I decided I was in a breakfast for lunch kind of mood, and substituted the water in the recipe for whey.

They turned out ok. I read that whey caused baked goods to brown faster, and it was certainly true in the pancakes. That in combination with a use of baking Pam instead of a regular Pam caused some of the pancakes to be a little on the dark side. However, they came out fluffy and very moist. The pancakes were thick without being heavy.

Recipe:
Mix 1 egg, jiffy banana muffin mix, and 1/3 cup of whey. Add half a cup of mini dark chocolate chips. Heat up a skillet on medium heat and pour pancakes batter about three to four inches across. Cook until the edges begin to brown and pancake can be flipped, about two minutes. Repeat until finished.

Day 2: Whey Biscuits

This may have been my favorite adventure thus far. I’ve never made biscuits so light and fluffy. They weren’t salty at all, perfect for pairing with the local whipped honey I’ve had in my cabinet for months or with a bit of salty butter and sharp cheddar. They’ve lasted several days, just wrapped in plastic.

The whey absolutely is what made the difference. I’ve made many biscuits in my life, and neither buttermilk nor regular milk has been as successful as whey.

Check out the whey biscuit recipe on Snap Guide

Day 3: Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

I based my recipe off Eat The Blog, nixing the nutmeg, raisins, and walnuts.

The cookies are super soft and moist. They almost have the texture of a no-bake cookie, despite the 10 minutes they spent in the oven. I have a feeling these will also last for an extended time without being refrigerated.

I can’t wait to make cheese again, if only to have the leftover whey. I wish it was possible to buy whey at my local grocery store, but somehow I’m doubting that’s available in my neighborhood. Anyone know of any hipster markets in Brooklyn selling the stuff?

I’ll need a fix soon.

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  • I know plenty of recipes that involve whey POWDER, which is very easy to acquire. Not sure about actual whey, though…

    • admin

      I only found a small handful of actual liquid whey recipes. Most of what I found was lists of “What to do with leftover whey.” The suggestion was always, “replace water/milk/buttermilk” in recipes or boil your pasta/vegetables.