Volcanic Activity Data

Volcano outside of Sitko, Alaska. Sunny Side Up, Attribution 2.0 Generic License

I have a mild fascination with natural disasters.

As you may remember, last October I spent multiple days trapped on an island due to Hurricane Sandy. I was stuck until I managed to escape just in time for NASA Social. This was not my first experience with natural disaster. In fact, as a child I lived in cities where natural disasters were frequent. I hid in the hallway of our family ranch home in Miami during Hurricane Andrew. I was even in the Bay Area for the Loma Prieta Earthquake (otherwise known as the World Series Earthquake).

I once took a class called Natural Hazards & Disasters, where we spent our time learning that we would never really be safe. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tornadoes, landslides… these can happen at any time. Some can be predicted; some cannot. If Yellowstone goes up (and it will at some point in the next 60,000 years) no amount of preparing will save us. Even if you’re out of the immediate danger zone (Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming would likely be completely inhabitable), there’s still the danger of ash flowing throughout the country. We’re talking major climate change and millions of people dying.

I’m not saying panic. Seriously. There’s only a 0.00014% yearly chance it will happen. Read more